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I was recently involved in a collaborative paper writing effort, and the people involved chose to use Overleaf as the main writing platform. Overleaf and ShareLaTeX, now under one roof, are the major online text editors for LaTeX files. The idea behind Overleaf is great - it’s like Google Docs for LaTeX documents. The problem is I’m not crazy about doing my writing on a web app - just a personal preference.

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The website I developed for my wedding, as I outlined in this previous post, reached the end of its lifetime. I had already downgraded Heroku back to the free tier, but Amazon S3 costs continued to accumulate. And since it has been almost one year since the wedding happened, there seemed to be no reason other than nostalgia to keep the website running. The entire source code has been dumped to GitHub - the only modification I’ve made was to replace some of the images with non-descript gradients.

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Elisabeth and I are getting married in a few weeks, which means we’ve been in wedding-planning mode for the past year or so. And while planning required the typical steps of finding a suitable venue and selecting a caterer and so on, we decided early on to rely enough on a wedding website, such that we could get away with (aka, the requirements): Instead of sending out one Save the Date card and one Invitation in the mail to each guest, we would send out a single invitation with the url for the website;

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Table of Contents What I’m doing What you’ll need Step 1: Install PCM Step 2: Using PCM’s CPU Counters in your code What I’m doing I needed to profile a C++ method for a graduate course I’m taking. More specifically, I wanted to be able to see memory access patterns and how the hit ratios for cache memory were affected by different coding strategies.

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